CONGRATULATIONS
cyprith:

wintergrey:

Reminder that Ferguson is a food desert and school is canceled. People’s movement is restricted. The work of the St Louis Food Bank is vital right now. Help if you can. (x)
STL FOOD BANK

Consider also donating in Michael Brown’s name, as the erin e did above.
Let the Ferguson police department know:

Ferguson Police Department
222 S Florissant Rd
Ferguson, MO 63135
314-522-3100

cyprith:

wintergrey:

Reminder that Ferguson is a food desert and school is canceled. People’s movement is restricted. The work of the St Louis Food Bank is vital right now. Help if you can. (x)

STL FOOD BANK

Consider also donating in Michael Brown’s name, as the erin e did above.

Let the Ferguson police department know:

Ferguson Police Department
222 S Florissant Rd
Ferguson, MO 63135
314-522-3100

(via ipissedinyourmountaindew)

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kropotkindersurprise:

Two ways of dealing with tear gas grenades from comrades in Turkey: Either submerge them in water. Make sure you can close off the container cause the gas will still spread for a while. Or throw them in the fire so the gas burns off before it can spread.

(via plumhead)

This was posted 22 hours ago. It has 64,210 notes and 0 comments.

cognitivedissonance:

Tonight in Ferguson, Mo. Even CNN is calling out police brutality.

We are watching history unfold. Do not stand down. Spread the word.

No justice, no peace.

(via salem-bambi)

This was posted 22 hours ago. It has 112,083 notes and 0 comments.

(Source: chuckesunderground, via ipissedinyourmountaindew)

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fehyesvintagemanga:

Matsumoto Reiji

fehyesvintagemanga:

Matsumoto Reiji

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(Source: zerosara, via the-pietriarchy)

This was posted 1 day ago. It has 27,203 notes and 0 comments.
wintergrey:

James Baldwin on “looting” (via x).

wintergrey:

James Baldwin on “looting” (via x).

(via elige)

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(Source: nhkofficial, via shit-soup)

This was posted 1 day ago. It has 1,014 notes and 0 comments.
stunningpicture:

The camera angle they never show on TV

stunningpicture:

The camera angle they never show on TV

(via pornstarkaraoke)

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laboratoryequipment:

Surfing Helps Cystic Fibrosis PatientsFor three of Rob and Paulette Montelone’s five kids, spending the summer surfing is more than just a fun activity. It could also extend their lives.The Montelone siblings are part of a growing number of people with cystic fibrosis who are taking advantage of the health benefits that come with surfing. Since researchers realized that the salt water in the ocean helps clear out the thick mucus that builds up in patients’ lungs, organizations have started around the world that teach those with the disease how to hang 10.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/surfing-helps-cystic-fibrosis-patients

laboratoryequipment:

Surfing Helps Cystic Fibrosis Patients

For three of Rob and Paulette Montelone’s five kids, spending the summer surfing is more than just a fun activity. It could also extend their lives.

The Montelone siblings are part of a growing number of people with cystic fibrosis who are taking advantage of the health benefits that come with surfing. Since researchers realized that the salt water in the ocean helps clear out the thick mucus that builds up in patients’ lungs, organizations have started around the world that teach those with the disease how to hang 10.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/surfing-helps-cystic-fibrosis-patients

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ananthymous:

ryankillustration:

New custom poster design I made for the 2008 film “Speed Racer”.
- Ryan

I love this poster and it always comes across my dash without attribution! Reblog from the original artist.

ananthymous:

ryankillustration:

New custom poster design I made for the 2008 film “Speed Racer”.

- Ryan

I love this poster and it always comes across my dash without attribution! Reblog from the original artist.

(via 500ac)

. It has 5,893 notes and 0 comments. .
ancientart:

A quick look at: mourning in ancient Egypt.
Photo: Relief showing mourners from Saqqara, now at the Louvre, ca. 1330 BCE.
It could be argued that many funerals today are for the benefit of the living instead of the salvation of the dead. This however was certainly not the case in ancient Egypt; the funeral, like the mummification process, was a vital stage in regeneration of the deceased -not an end, rather the first stage in the final voyage.
The cortège which accompanied the mummy to the cemetery could include the sem-priest, lector-priest, the widow (or sometimes a paid substitute), friends, family, servants, and band of professional mourners. These professional mourners were hired to weep and wail, pull their hair and clothes, beat at their chests, and to smear their body with dirt -all of which were signs of uncontrolled behaviour. Among artistic representations of these professional mourners are often small girls emulating their moves, which may be indicative that mourners were trained on the job.
The grief of family members and mourners was artistically presented with remarkable intensity, solemn and silent sorrow was expressed by the placing of the hands over the cheeks or the head on the knees.
Those walking in the funeral had certain words to utter and speeches, all highlighting virtues of the deceased. This was an appeal to the gods of the underworld to take the deceased person to dwell amongst them. The words spoken were expressed from their hearts, and full of emotion and grief. Evidently very strong social and family ties existed in ancient Egyptian society. Some of these phrases written for the dead remain preserved for us to read today, here is one such example: ”Do not leave me, come to me, come look after us. O kind father!”
Shown artifact courtesy of & currently located at the Louvre, France. Photo taken by Anne-Marie Bouché. When writing up this post, Abeer el Shahawy’s The Funerary Art of Ancient Egypt (American Univ in Cairo Press, 2005) was of use. As was Joyce Tyldesley’s The Penguin Book of Myths and Legends of Ancient Egypt (Penguin Global, 2012).

ancientart:

A quick look at: mourning in ancient Egypt.

Photo: Relief showing mourners from Saqqara, now at the Louvre, ca. 1330 BCE.

It could be argued that many funerals today are for the benefit of the living instead of the salvation of the dead. This however was certainly not the case in ancient Egypt; the funeral, like the mummification process, was a vital stage in regeneration of the deceased -not an end, rather the first stage in the final voyage.

The cortège which accompanied the mummy to the cemetery could include the sem-priest, lector-priest, the widow (or sometimes a paid substitute), friends, family, servants, and band of professional mourners. These professional mourners were hired to weep and wail, pull their hair and clothes, beat at their chests, and to smear their body with dirt -all of which were signs of uncontrolled behaviour. Among artistic representations of these professional mourners are often small girls emulating their moves, which may be indicative that mourners were trained on the job.

The grief of family members and mourners was artistically presented with remarkable intensity, solemn and silent sorrow was expressed by the placing of the hands over the cheeks or the head on the knees.

Those walking in the funeral had certain words to utter and speeches, all highlighting virtues of the deceased. This was an appeal to the gods of the underworld to take the deceased person to dwell amongst them. The words spoken were expressed from their hearts, and full of emotion and grief. Evidently very strong social and family ties existed in ancient Egyptian society. Some of these phrases written for the dead remain preserved for us to read today, here is one such example: Do not leave me, come to me, come look after us. O kind father!”

Shown artifact courtesy of & currently located at the Louvre, France. Photo taken by Anne-Marie Bouché. When writing up this post, Abeer el Shahawy’s The Funerary Art of Ancient Egypt (American Univ in Cairo Press, 2005) was of use. As was Joyce Tyldesley’s The Penguin Book of Myths and Legends of Ancient Egypt (Penguin Global, 2012).

(via athousandnewdisguises)

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grilledsneakers:

This is what the people of Ferguson are up against and if you still don’t think that this is a big deal then you need to wake the fuck up

(via shit-soup)

This was posted 2 days ago. It has 123,901 notes and 0 comments.
expansivemouthfeel:

Unica Zürn, pages from Orakel und Spektacle (1960). More here.

expansivemouthfeel:

Unica Zürn, pages from Orakel und Spektacle (1960). More here.

(via 1910-again)

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(Source: psykzz, via psykzz)

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